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Aviation

 - 438 items found in your search
Aviation

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1 73rd Bomb Wing. The Story of the 73rd: The Unofficial History of the 73rd Bomb Wing.
Nashville: The Battery Press, 1980. Facsimile reprint of the 1946 edition. 
Quarto, illustrated red cloth (hardcover), unpaginated. Photos, map endpapers. Fine, with bookplate. World War II aviation. 
Price: 50.00 USD
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2 Air Ministry. Night Observation from the Air. Air Ministry Pamphlet 162.
Issued by the Air Ministry, June 1944. This Pamphlet is RESTRICTED: it is not to be shown to anyone outside the Service nor to be taken into the air. 
Quarto, paperbound (stiff, stapled, illus. wrappers), 35 pp. Very Good. 
Price: 20.00 USD
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3 Allen, Richard Sanders. Revolution in the Sky: Those Fabulous Lockheeds, The Pilots Who Flew Them.
Brattleboro, Vt.: Stephen Greene Press, 1964. First Edition. 
Signed by the Author. Quarto, blue cloth (hardcover), xi, 232 pp. Photos, map endpapers. Fine, with bookplate. Golden Age of Aviation. 
Price: 45.00 USD
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4 Allen, Wing Commander H. R., D.F.C. The Legacy of Lord Trenchard.
London: Cassell, (1972). 
Octavo, blue boards (hardcover), gilt letters, xi + 228 pp. Near-Fine, with former-owner bookplate and light speckling to edges; in a Fine dust jacket. From dust jacket: In 1956 the 83-year-old Marshal of the Royal Air Force the Viscount Trenchard, GCB, OM, GCVO, DSO, DCL, LLD, was buried in Westminster Abbey with full military honours. The Father of the Royal Air Force had lived to see the policies he had propounded at the birth of the RAF during the First World War carried on by his successors while he, by dint of his awesome personality and great prestige, continued from the eminence of the House of Lords to dominate Britain's air policy through the expansion of the RAF prior to the SEcond World War, Wing Commander Allen, a well-known defence commentator and military economist, shows that Trenchard lacked the mental stature to imbue the RAF with the correct military philosophy and the myths that grew up around him were to the detriment of British bombing policy. This is the first book to attempt a cost-effective evaluation of our strategic airoffensive which broadly failed in its war aims. The failure of the RAF to pinpoint comparatively small targets in the early years of the Second World War forced the top brass to the fallacious conclusion that the burning of seventy of the largest cities in Germany would win the war for the Allies. This all-out assault on civilian morale was contrary to the beliefs of Churchill and Roosevelt, who were in favour of destryoing the Luftwaffe and its supporting factories, but the RAF defiantly made the cities their target. The Battle of Berlin in March 1944 proved how wrong they were. It cost the RAF 600 Lancaster bombers aloe and did not, as was hoped, bring the war to an end. Nevertheless Harmburg and Dresden were razed, because of a refusal to believe that the bombing of specific installations would have been more effective than saturation bombing of cities with their largely civilian populations. Post-war policies and Air Staff plans for the future the author feels are disastrous and he has some intriguing ideas for the possible future use of defunct airfields. Altogether, a book that will undoubtedly provoke opposition as well as approval, but one that cannot be ignored in the face of the present discussions on the cutback of government spending on the armed forces. 
Price: 15.00 USD
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5 Anderson, Col. Clarence E. “Bud,” with Joseph P. Hamelin. To Fly and Fight: Memoirs of a Triple Ace. Foreword by Brig. Gen. Churck Yeager.
(1990). First Edition. 
Signed by the author on rear endpaper. Octavo, blue boards (hardcover), xiii, 306, [i] pp. Photos. Fine in dust jacket. 
Price: 20.00 USD
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6 Anderson, R. G. Results of the 1965 Flight-Deck Data Collection on Height Keeping over the North Atlantic. Royal Aircraft Establishment, Technical Report No. 65268. November 1965.
Ministry of Aviation, Farnborough Hants, 1965. 
Royal octavo, paperbound (stiff blue stapled wrappers), 23 pp + 7 Figures. Fine. 
Price: 15.00 USD
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7 Andrews, C. F. Vickers Aircraft since 1908.
London: Putnam, (1969). First Edition. 
Octavo, blue cloth (hardcover), x, 566 pp. Photos, illus. Fine, with bookplate, in dust jacket with mylar protector. 
Price: 25.00 USD
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8 Angolia, LTC (Ret.) John R. and Clint R. Hackney Jr. The POUR le MERITE and Germany's First Aces.
Friendswood, TX: Hackney Publishing Co., (1984). First Edition. 
Octavo, black leatherette (hardcover), gilt letters, 288 pp. Fine, in a Good dust jacket with edgewear. From dust jacket: This is a book about a medal and the early airmen who sought to achieve the distinction of wearing it. Never before has the coveted Pour le Merite been explained so in-depth and its recipients explored so diligently. Anyone who has an interest in the “Blue Max” and the flying men who were awarded it will not be able to put this book down. It is fascinating reading from beginning to end and a credit to the authors who wrote it. 
Price: 15.00 USD
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9 Anonymous. Zeppeline uber England.
Berlin: Ullstein & Co., 1916, First Edition. 
Duodecimo, softbound, 151 pp., ads. Plates. Very Good, with bookplate. 
Price: 10.00 USD
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10 Appleyard, Squadron Leader Keith, ed. Tengah 1939-1967.
N.l.: RAF Tengah, (1967). 
Octavo, softbound, 68 pp. Photos, maps. Near-Fine, with bookplate. 
Price: 25.00 USD
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11 Appleyard, Squadron Leader Keith; editor. Tengah 1939 - 1967,
N.l.: RAF Tengah, (1967). 
Octavo, softbound, 68 pp. Photos, maps. Near-Fine, with bookplate. 
Price: 25.00 USD
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12 Armstrong, Anthony. Prangmere Mess and Other Tales.
London: Methuen & Co., Ltd., (1943). 
Octavo, gray cloth (hardcover), 100 pp. Near-Fine, with former-owner bookplate; in a Very Good dust jacket with darkened spine and light rubbing. 
Price: 10.00 USD
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13 Ashworth, Chris. AVRO's Maritime Heavyweight: The Shackleton.
Aston Publications, (1990). Number 6 of a limited edition of 100 signed copies for The Shckleton Association. 
Quarto, leatherbound, gilt letters, 247 pp. Fine, with bookplate, in a Near-Fine, price-clipped dust jacket. From dust jacket: When the Shackleton is finally made redundant by the Boeing Sentry AEW.1 in 1991 it will have completed 40 years of frontline operational service with the Royal Air Force -- an achievement without parallel amongst four-engined ‘heavies' and undreamed of when the aircraft was first projected in 1944. In 11 fully illustrated chapters this book details the development and service history of this long-lived aircraft, covering not only the maritime reconnaissance role for which it was originally inteneded, but also its use for air-sea rescue, trooping, colonial policing and airborne early warning. Three additional chapters explore the Shackleton's operations with the South African Air Force, it suse on research work, and projects. Nine appendices provide extensive information on specifications, performance, colour schemes and markings, production contracts and, last but not least, individual histories of every Shackleton built -- invaluable for model makers and old Shackleton ‘hands' interested in discovering just what did happen to ‘their' aircraft. The book contains over 250 illustrations, has four pages of full-colour artwork and a magificent cut-away drawing. Diagrams illustrate the usage of the aircraft during SAR and maritime operations... 
Price: 30.00 USD
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14 Ashworth, Chris. RAF Coastal Command, 1936-1969.
Patrick Stephens Limited, (1992). 
Octavo, blue boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 256 pp. Fine, with bookplate; in a Fine dust jacket. From dust jacket: Although RAF Coastal Command existed for 33 years, playing a key role throughout the SEcond World War and beyond, it was little known by the general public or understood by the rest of the Royal Air Force. Formed in 1936, it as still a small reconnaissance force at the outbreak of war, operating almost exlusively on behalf of the Royal Navy. But gradually “Coastal” became an essential part of offensive maritime operations against both the German U-boats and surface shipping. The closing of the Atlantic Gap in 1941-2 and the successful Bay of Biscay operations helped force the U-botas on to the defensive and prevent them starving Britain of food and the means to fight -- while the Strike Wing concept was vital in the battle against the enemy's coastal shipping. The Command had responsibility for “weather” flights. It also undertook photo reconnaissance, and air-sea rescue throughout a parish that stretched from Iceland to the Azores. Post-war came the inevitable contraction, but the Command was still a viable force when its assets were handed over to No 18 (Maritime) Group in 1969. The impressive wartime story covers the “reign” of four commanders: Bowhill, Joubert, Slessor, and Sholto Douglas. Woven into the text are the effects of external pressures on forward planning and daily operations -- although taxed with crucial and dangerous work, Coastal Command was always the Cinderella when it came to funding. Also considered in detail are the weapons, equipment and tactics deployed and, post-war, the development of the Shackleton and NImrod... 
Price: 15.00 USD
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15 Avery, D. The Concise Illustrated Book of Fighters of World War II.
New York: W. H. Smith Publishers Inc., [1989]. 
Oblong octavo, full-colour illus. boards (hardcover), 46 pp. Fine (As New), in like dust jacket. Full-colour illustrations. Includes glossary. “This concise volume contains examples of the fighters which faced each other during World War II. Each example is fully illustrated and accompanied by complete specifications.” 
Price: 10.00 USD
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16 Bacon, Gertrude. All About Flying.
London: Methuen, (1915). Methuen's Sport Series. First Edition. 
Duodecimo, green cloth (hardcover), x, 115 pp. Photos. Gertrude Bacon was the first woman in England to make a balloon ascent, the first woman to fly in an airship, and the first Englishwoman to fly in an airplane. Very Good, with bookplate. 
Price: 20.00 USD
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17 Bacon, Gertrude. The Record of an Aeronaut; Being the Life of John M. Bacon.
London: John Long, 1907. 
Octavo, blue cloth (hardcover), uncut, 358 pp. Frontis., plates. Fine. 
Price: 45.00 USD
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18 Barber, H. The Aeroplane Speaks.
London: McBride, Nast & Co., (1917). Fifth Edition. 
Octavo, flexible cloth, 156 pp. Plates, illustrations, ads. Very Good. 
Price: 20.00 USD
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19 Baring, Maurice. R.F.C. H.Q., 1914-1918.
London: G. Bell and Sons, 1920. First Edition. 
Octavo, black cloth (hardcover), [iv], 315 pp. Very Good; bookplate, four or five small speckles on rear cover, light foxing along edges of text block. 
Price: 50.00 USD
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20 Barker, Ralph. The Schneider Trophy Races.
London: Chatto and Windus, 1971. 
Octavo, turquoise boards (hardcover), gilt letters, 272 pp. Very Good, with a former-owner bookplate; in a mylar protected dust jacket that has been reinforced with tape to its underside and has light edgewear. From dust jacket: The first contest for the Schneider Trophy was no more than a single and apparently minor item in a 14 day hydro-aeroplane meeting at Monaco in April 1913; yet within ten years it had become the most coveted of all air prizes, the greatest international speed race of all time. Dominated at first by France, it was very nearly won outright by Italy -- three wins in five years was what was required -- in the years immediately after the first World War. A flying-boat modified by a young man named R. J. Mitchell saved the trophy at Naples in 1922, but in 1923 the Americans, fielding a well-trained military team and flying the incomparable Curtiss racer, outclassed all their rivals and carried off the trophy. Winning again at Baltimore in 1925, they seemed certain to capture the prize outright. But then came the Italians' greatest moment as the firms of Macci and Fiat achieved the miracle of producing in seven months a new monoplane which defeated the seemingly unbeatable Curtiss bilanes at Hampton Roads, Virginia. A British victory at Venice brought the contest to England in 1929 for the first time for six years, and a thrilling race in which a new Supermarine design was powered for the first time by a Rolls-Royce engine ended in another British victory. The political, technical and economic background to the challenges of the various countries had been a fascinating one throughout, and now the need for economy decided the British Government against further offical participation -- a decision already taken by the United States. How Lady Houston kept Britain's chances alive with a git of 100,00, and how Britain finally secured the trophy, makes a draamtic climax to a unique story of human progress and endeavour. 
Price: 10.00 USD
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